Traditional Balancing Methods Require More Correction Weight

Most balancers calculate correction weight using technology developed during the 1970's when wheels with rim flange clipon weights were common. When balancing today’s alloy wheels, weights are moved from the rim flange to the inside of the wheel. Weight placement is narrowed, tape weights are required and much more correction weight will be necessary to correct the same couple imbalance*.

Traditional 1970’s style steel wheel with clip-on weights on the rim flange.Traditional 1970’s style steel wheel with clip-on weights on the rim flange.
Today’s alloy wheels often have no rim flange and require larger amounts of tape weights to correct for similar amounts of imbalance.Today’s alloy wheels often have no rim flange and require larger amounts of tape weights to correct for similar amounts of imbalance.

Static and Couple Vibration Forces

Traditional balancers use a fixed tolerance on correction weights regardless of the weight location chosen, effectively placing equal emphasis on static and couple imbalance. However, all vehicles are inherently much more sensitive to static vibration force than couple force.

Left: Static Imbalance (Shake), Right: Couple Imbalance (Shimmy)Left: Static Imbalance (Shake), Right: Couple Imbalance (Shimmy)

OEM testing and specifications show that wheels can tolerate up to five times as much couple imbalance as static imbalance before a noticeable vibration occurs in the vehicle.**

Because of the design of suspension systems, vehicles are more sensitive to static vibration.Because of the design of suspension systems, vehicles are more sensitive to static vibration.

* Additional weight required is dependent on weight separation and location of wheel planes.
**Based on a 15” X 6” wheel with clip weights.